Sat | Oct 31, 2020

Best time to release motivational music, say practitioners

Published:Saturday | March 28, 2020 | 12:09 AMKimberley Small/Staff Reporter
Producer Frankie Campbell of Frankie Music Productions (centre) hangs out with Romain Virgo (left) and Kumar Bent during a studio session.
Producer Frankie Campbell of Frankie Music Productions (centre) hangs out with Romain Virgo (left) and Kumar Bent during a studio session.

For the time being, there are no stages on which to perform or parties to attend. But that doesn’t mean that the music industry activity has come to a sudden halt. Entertainers are getting more creative with online concerts, parties, and podcasts. But more notable is that production continues, and local fans can expect to add brand-new music to their libraries despite the COVID-19 clampdown. But not just any music.

There is a shared opinion that there is a type of music that works for now, a time when people are frightened, harrowed, and threatened. Between Recording Academy-recognised producer Frankie Campbell of Frankie Music Productions and reggae singer Kumar, it’s best if the music being released these days is motivating.

Because people have more time on their hands, Frankie believes that it is possible that they may give attention to something they would have passed by pre-corona crisis. So they will listen to something that they wouldn’t on a regular day. “In that case, I’d say it’s not a bad time. But not for all music. I think at this time, a spiritual or motivational song would be very good for an artiste to release to give people hope,” he told The Gleaner.

Outbreak

The final mix is still on the way, but Frankie has put his money where his mouth is. Not specifically named to refer to the COVID-19 crisis, he is preparing to release a new song called Outbreak.

“It’s a motivational song to bring entertainment despite the crisis. So it’s really a song like We Are The World or One Love,” he explained. Outbreak features vocal contributions by Kandy Leax, Qraig Voicemail, and Kim Nain – artistes in Frankie’s camp.

“Outbreak refers to anything that can outbreak in any country. I could name the song ‘World Crisis’, but I chose Outbreak because in this time, there are a lot of things breaking out and affecting human beings,” Frankie continued.

Frankie takes the position that in every circumstance in life, including a global pandemic, there are good and bad opportunities that could arise. He believes musicians have a good opportunity because “right now, people are at home streaming a lot. If you can give them content that can satisfy dem soul, it would be a good time for you”, Frankie reasoned.

Kumar agreed. “It encourages us to make songs for the time, not for the party and club, but for the people to be motivated to stay alive and feed their families. There is never a better time than when the time is right, and now, people are longing for good music and want to hear something that brings them a bit of peace and understanding,” he said.

Unhindered by the global economic cascade caused by the pandemic, last Friday, Kumar premiered the music video for his latest single, Remember Me, which precedes Kulture Walk, the singer’s debut solo album, due out on May 1.

He continued, with the rationale that the listening public isn’t banking on the virus ruining the remainder of their lives, therefore, “it’s a good time for us to get creative. And people have time on their hands. That’s where all the hope rests for me. Who knows who might listen? They might start listening one, two, or three weeks later, but the point is that people will,” he said.

For DJ, producer, and A&R executive Yared Lee, there’s never a bad time to release music. However, “there might be bad times to make money from music. But releasing music? Never!” he asserted.

“Even in these unstable times, there are aspects of the music industry contracting and parts of it that are expanding. Passive consumption of music has fallen, however, any artiste with a well-engaged fan base can release music any time and find success, I think,” Lee added.

kimberley.small@gleanerjm.com