Sun | Dec 5, 2021

‘I ran a good race’

Fraser-Pryce contented with 200m final run, but disappointed with 100m execution

Published:Wednesday | August 4, 2021 | 12:12 AMAndrÈ Lowe/Sports Editor
Jamaican sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (left) looks for confirmation of her placing as The Bahamas’ Shaunae Miller-Uibo walks by following the women’s 200 metres final at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, inside the Tokyo Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan, yeste
Jamaican sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (left) looks for confirmation of her placing as The Bahamas’ Shaunae Miller-Uibo walks by following the women’s 200 metres final at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, inside the Tokyo Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan, yesterday.

TOKYO, Japan: While admitting that she was seriously disappointed with missing out on the 100 metres gold medal, Jamaican sprinting icon, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, says she was satisfied with her effort in the 200-metre final at the Tokyo 2020...

TOKYO, Japan:

While admitting that she was seriously disappointed with missing out on the 100 metres gold medal, Jamaican sprinting icon, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, says she was satisfied with her effort in the 200-metre final at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, despite her fourth-place finish.

Fraser-Pryce, a two-time Olympic champion and seven-time medallist, had to settle for fourth in yesterday’s 200 metres final, which was won by compatriot and former training partner, Elaine Thompson-Herah, in a national record 21.53 seconds.

This follows the silver medal she won in Sunday’s 100-metre final.

“I believe that as athletes our emotions are what makes us real and relatable and I think I was disappointed in the 100 metres mainly because I felt I did not run my best race and that cost me. As an athlete, you want to make sure that every time you step on the line you are running your best race technically to give yourself the best chance,” said Fraser-Pryce.

“Whenever I step on the line the intention is that I am going to the line for first and you have to execute the way you need to, to get that. I don’t know what happened on the first stride and instead of holding my phase, I rushed through and that happened,” she added.

She then reflected on the 200-metre final result, which saw her crossing the line in 21.94 seconds.

“With disappointments come lessons, so you take the lessons and move on and I was hoping to come to the 200m and have a good race. I think that even though I finished outside the medals and I am not going be standing on the podium, I still think I ran a good race and I cannot take that away from myself. I think I was competitive throughout and I am proud of that and I am happy with that,” Fraser-Pryce shared.

The silver medal went to Christine Mboma from Namibia, who was recently banned from competing in events ranging from the 400m to 1500m because of elevated testosterone levels, due to sexual development differences. Another Namibian, Beatrice Masilingi, who finished sixth in the event, is also facing the same ban.

Mboma clocked a world under-20 record, 21.81 seconds, with American Gabrielle Thomas, 21.87, taking the bronze medal.

FRASER-PRYCE’S TAKE ON MBOMA AND MASILINGI

Fraser-Pryce brushed aside controversy surrounding Mboma and Masilingi’s participation.

“World Athletics allowed the ladies to compete in this particular event, there is nothing I or anybody else can do. We can talk about it all we want, but I don’t think that’s an excuse for anybody,” said Fraser-Pryce. “They were denied running a specific event that they wanted to run and they were given another event and I think they coming here and still excelling in that event is a good thing. That’s something that, if anybody else or any athlete has an issue with, they will have to take it up with World Athletics because the rules are clear, they were allowed to compete.”

Fraser-Pryce added: “I didn’t even go in the race thinking that something was wrong with anybody in the race, it’s us all competing for a chance of Olympic glory.

“It must be unfair on them. If I am a 19-year-old and somebody is telling me that I can’t run this, I must run that. I think it may have impacted them a bit, but to be able to still come out here and compete given the circumstances is admirable,” she added.

Fraser-Pryce, who is competing in her fourth Olympic Games, has been somewhat coy about her future, but again seemed to suggest that she will close her Olympic career in Tokyo, even though she declined the opportunity to provide confirmation.

“I will let you know, you will know for sure (if this is my last Olympics). Am I harbouring thoughts of another Olympics? I am not. God has been good. I have had an amazing career and for me I really hope coronavirus didn’t happen because World Championships in Oregon would have been it, so I am mentally preparing myself seeing what next year will bring because I would definitely want to have my family close, all my family to Oregon for the World Championships,” said Fraser-Pryce.

andre.lowe@gleanerjm.com